Millennial Migration: What Will Happen to Branded and Curated Content?

Millennial Migration: What Will Happen to Branded and Curated Content?

As I sat at my undergraduate graduation this past weekend, I saw hundreds of my peers taking photos, Instagramming, Snapchatting, and posting photos to other social media sites. A quick glance through my various social media timelines confirmed my suspicion. Their actions were not simply to capture memories but to share a change in their social status with the digital world.

For Millennials, the act of posting photos to social media is a chance for instant gratification. Quantified by likes and comments, memories have evolved far from the old shoebox in which my parents used to store 4×6 photo prints. With so much thought devoted to the caption and composition of each photo uploaded to social media, it is easy to understand why little thought is given to the future of said content.

Similar to the migration of downloaded music to streaming (this reference definitely labels me as a Millennial because I said “downloaded music”, and not CD’s), social media usage trends are bound to change with the demands of future generations. What will happen to all of the memories that my peers deposited on Facebook? Will they be lost forever when platform use declines? Will an entrepreneur charge to migrate and reformat digital content?

While I do not have immediate answers to the questions I posed above, I do foresee a major challenge for brands that invest heavily in their digital brand across the most popular social media platforms. Simply posting branded content and investing heavily in digital brand management is not enough as culture rapidly advances into an uncertain digital abyss. Millennials are known for varying heavily in preferences depending on the day and social climate.

Gen Y’s behavior is driven by an innate desire to stay in the know and on top of current trends. Shouldn’t brands and digital content producers do the same? It is important for brands to choose their digital investments wisely in the coming years as what is popular today may not be in six months.

It would be a shame for thousands of dollars of branded and curated digital content housed on social media platforms to be lost because of a brand’s inability to keep up with consumer trends and preferences. I’d suggest that brands and individuals refrain from investing all of their money and memories so heavily into just one or two social media platforms. It’s hard to tell a consistent story when the content that contributed greatly to the company’s advertising economies of scale is inaccessible or rarely viewed on an extinct platform.

For all of you social media and brand managers out there, heed this message: monitor your consumers’ media consumption habits and platforms, and be prepared to migrate curated and branded content from platform to platform. Afterall, it’s called brand management, not brand sit back and watch!

Garrett Meccariello is an aspiring brand strategist and researcher based out of NYC. In his free time he can be found building the next great brand, exploring the city, and eating a lot of cured meat and cheese.

Photo Credit

Is Your Professional Brand Recession Proof?

Is Your Professional Brand Recession Proof?

In times of consistent month-after-market growth and near perfect employment (occurs when the unemployment rate is between 2-7%), professionals rarely think about how they will recruit clients in tough economic times. It is too late to start thinking about your business back up plan once a recession hits.

Personal and professional brands, similar to those of large corporations are susceptible to market slow downs. Whether you are a lawyer, doctor, or entrepreneur working on a side hustle, it is imperative that you strategize a plan B (or C) to prepare for a market downturn.

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When the market performs well, economists see increased levels of disposable income spent by consumers throughout the economy. Once leading indicators predict a slow down, news sources and pundits herald calls for recessionary spending cuts and budgeting. Unemployment levels will begin to rise simultaneously as companies and families cut back spending habits and the economy contracts.

What does this slowdown in personal consumption habits have to do with your side hustle or law practice you may ask? Simply put: when confidence in the market drops, discretionary consumer spending also drops.

Since the rise of the .COM boom in the early 2000’s, entrepreneurs have monetized the Internet, and capitalized on its benefits during economic slowdowns. Three simple digital marketing strategies below will add to your armamentarium to recession proof your personal or professional brand:

Content Marketing: It’s a free way to exhibit thought leadership and increase the authority of your personal or professional brand. If you aren’t able to convert clients or customers during their first experience with your brand, a consistent flow of content can help convert them sometime down the road.

PPC Advertising: Rather then spending money to attract business with traditional outbound marketing initiatives (while an individual is not in the market for your products or services), refocus your marketing budget towards inbound channels such as pay-per-click marketing on Google, Yahoo, or Bing (to quote a Millennial friend of mine, “Eww lol”). By targeting spending toward interested individuals when they are ready to purchase, you have the ability to ensure a higher ROI on your campaigns.

SEO: Inbound marketing efforts touch individuals in the research phase of the digital customer acquisition cycle. Enhancing one’s search engine optimization strategy will improve digital authority and entice individuals to click through to your website and engage with your products or service. The best part about SEO initiatives: they’re free!

Strategize your recessionary marketing plan today before it’s too late. During economic dips, turn your free time into a marketing asset that can boost and maintain your digital brand for your professional services or products. Discounting marketing and advertising initiatives during a recession can spell out the death of your brand. Do not, I repeat do not, fall victim to a slow down. Utilize your understanding of consumer behavior and economics to build out a robust, recession proof marketing plan that will keep your personal brand afloat in challenging economic times.

Garrett Meccariello is an aspiring brand strategist and researcher based out of NYC. In his free time he can be found building the next great brand, exploring the city, and eating a lot of cured meat and cheese.

15 Free Marketing Resources for Startups & Small Businesses

15 Free Marketing Resources for Startups & Small Businesses

Stuck in a rut with your small business or startup’s marketing plan? Are you looking to boost your brand, web presence, or marketing initiatives? Check out my top 15 recommendations for online marketing resources guaranteed to drive traffic and brand exposure:

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Small Business Marketing HAS Changed. Cartoon by Mark Anderson.
  1. Build a Website, and a Good One Too! (Squarespace)
  2. How to Submit Your Website to Google (HubSpot)
  3. What Is Content Marketing? (Content Marketing Institute)
  4. How to Launch & Manage a Successful Blog in 2017 (HubSpot)
  5. An Introduction to Social Media Marketing: A Guide for Small Businesses (Social Media Today)
  6. How PPC Fits into Your Digital Marketing Strategy (Portent)
  7. What is Marketing ROI? (Explania)
  8. Update: How to Host a Kick-Ass Event (Eventbrite)
  9. 6 Steps to the Perfect Pitch (Entrepreneur)
  10. How To Network Like A Pro (Business Insider)
  11. How-to Create the Perfect Brand Partnership (Brands With Fans)
  12. Ten ways to build a brand for your small business (Marketing Donut)
  13. The Complete Guide to Building Your Personal Brand (Patel & Agius)*
  14. How To Build A Marketing Dream Team For Your Brand (Even If You Aren’t A Marketer) (Digital Marketer)
  15. Key Things to Look for in a Marketing Consultant (Chron)

I cannot stress enough how important it is for startup founders and small business owners alike to build and maintain their own personal brand separate from their entity. Often times, VC’s and other investors look for personal traits before making a significant capital contribution. If you would like to learn more about how your personal brand can impact investor’s decicisons, check out this article “5 Personality Traits Investors Look for in Entrepreneurs” by Entrepreneur.

Do you still have a marketing question, or are you looking for more guidance on building your company’s brand or digital marketing strategy? Feel free to get in touch with me here.

Garrett Meccariello is an aspiring brand strategist based out of NYC. In his free time he can be found building the next great brand, exploring the city, and eating a lot of cured meat and cheese.